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Hybrids by Whitley Strieber
Cover Artist: Getty Images
Review by Joseph B. Hoyos
Tor Books Hardcover  ISBN/ITEM#: 9780765323767
Date: 12 April 2011 List Price $24.99 Amazon US / Amazon UK / Show Article /

In Dulce, New Mexico, 1952, alien and human scientists labored together to create flesh-and-blood bodies for the biomechanical aliens to inhabit while living on Earth. The experiment failed and the aliens departed. In the 1980s, under the guidance of genetics engineer Dr. Thomas Ford Turner, Project Hybrid combined human DNA with alien DNA to create a boy (Generation One) and a girl (Generation Two) who were super strong, super intelligent biomechanical creatures who appeared perfectly human. In order to perfect the ultimate warrior, Project Hybrid combined mostly animal DNA with alien DNA. The result was Generation Three, which was similar to the previous generations but reptilian in appearance and extremely vicious and deceptive. A Senate Select Committee ordered all hybrids destroyed, but they survived. In the present, Generation Three is determined to conquer the world and only Generations One and Two can prevent them.

From official release/information:

Product Description: For years, people have feared that sexual material removed from victims of alien abductions might lead to the creation of something that modern science considers impossible: hybrids of the alien and the human.

They would think like aliens, but appear human, and be able to do something that full-blooded aliens can't--walk the earth freely.

(Source: Tor Books)

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